Reflexology heals

Annette Maynard-Watson,

Added 22 October 2012


POOR CIRCULATION, back pain, insomnia, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, stress, migraine and multiple sclerosis among others are health challenges successfully treated with reflexology. In fact, a young lady suffering with ovarian cysts for a long time became pregnant. These are some of the passionate testimonies of Jan Alleyne, a British-trained, certified reflexologist with more than 11 years’ experience. It was a plea from many readers of this column that moved me to call on Jan’s services at Energistics – an ozone-based therapy and reflexology centre at Sugar Cane Mall, Roebuck Street. She is also a retired British-trained registered nurse with over 34 years’ experience. “I used my skills as a reflexologist to help some of my patients and reflexology is used extensively in Britain’s hospitals, nursing homes, offices, homes, maternity wards, and at palliative care centres for cancer patients.” Jan explained that reflexology is a natural therapy where neither drugs nor medication is used. The reflexologist will apply gentle pressure to specific zones and areas of the foot that correspond with organs and systems in the body, stimulating the body’s energy flow. This gentle therapy encourages the body to heal itself. She also said an increasing number of people are finding that reflexology marks a turning point in their health, helping the body to become relaxed, balanced, and in harmony. Jan said “the feet can actually ‘talk’ to reflexologists”. The tactile nature of reflexology enables them to detect certain sensitive aspects of the client. They may detect a problem by feeling (crystals) under the skin, denoting a blockage in that zone. This may also come in the form of what reflexologists term as happy or sad feet. Jan said that she never diagnoses clients. After taking a comprehensive history of the client’s lifestyle, a holistic approach is taken. This includes giving advice on diet and exercise and referral to an appropriate medical or complementary therapist if the challenge discovered is very complex. A course of treatment varies and depends on the particular challenge and how quickly the body responds. An average course of treatment may be five 45-minute sessions. Both feet are examined for problems such as athlete’s foot, fungus – especially under the nails and between the toes, bunions, calluses, dry and cracked areas, and also for cold or warmth. Care of the feet and legs must become paramount in our grooming process. Reflexology combined with silent doctors yields dynamic results.   •  Annette Maynard-Watson, a teacher and herbal educator, may be contacted at or call 250-6450. Disclaimer: It is not our intention to prescribe or make specific health claims for any products. Any attempt to diagnose and treat real illness should come under the direction of your health care professional.


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