• Today
    November 19

  • 01:59 AM

Strong family bonds

KENDY GRAHAM,

Added 21 May 2018

chad-monerville-and-mum-sue-052018

Although she can be tough, Chad knows he can count on the advice and support of mum Sue Monerville. (Picture by Reco Moore.)

Chad Joshua Demario Monerville seems reserved, but don’t be fooled. Chad is his mother’s child. While not as demonstrative as his mother Sue Monerville, when the conversation gets going, Chad gets really involved. He is articulate, engaging, knowledgeable and, most importantly, extremely pleasant and charming.

These are qualities which would make any mother proud and Sue is quick to let you know “that’s my boy”.

Chad, 22, is a valuation surveyor and a passionate youth advocate across the Americas and Asia. He believes in the value of a good education, as instilled by his mother.

“My mum played a pivotal role in my early education. My dad Ryvan supported me through university, but it was my mum who was the ultimate support pillar. She is a strong motivational factor. There are so many words you can use to describe her. She worked hard to mould me into the way I am.

“Did you know I was at primary school at two years old in diapers?” Chad asked, laughingly.

Sue acknowledged it: “I was always around Wilkie Cumberbatch School with his older siblings [twins Akelia and Akeem]. I was always engaged in the school’s activities, including Cub Scouts and Parent-Teacher events. When I got the job at Service Commission, the principal told me, ‘Put on the child clothes and send him long’,” Sue said.

“He was in Reception twice. My biggest thing was always education. That was something I always instilled in my kids. Education to help the poor man out of poverty,” she added.

Chad is at a good place in his life and has plans to go much further. But there was a point when his performance was not up to standard and his mother and principal of Queen’s College, Dr David Browne, sat him down for a stern talk. After that’ Chad pulled up his socks, so to speak, and has been excelling ever since.

“Throughout QC I was more focused on talking. I was always into sports – cricket, track. I literally tried to do schoolwork as quickly as possible so that I could get time to talk. When I got to university I had an early talk with head of engineering Dr Ramlal who impressesd on me that the three years for a Bachelor’s fly really quickly, so you have to do really well,” said Chad.

After his first year at St Augustine (University of the West Indies Campus in Trinidad), where he studied for a degree in geomatics engineering (dealing with spatial measurements and the management of global infrastructure through collection, monitoring and archiving of geospatial data), Chad was given the University Open Scholarship, which is a full scholarship and one of the university’s most prestigious.

During his studies at St Augustine there were many different accolades, and he graduated top of his class  with first class honours, being humble and thankful each step of the way.

Chad has started mentoring other young people. He believes it is only fair as he has a team of professional mentors both in Barbados and abroad.

Chad is employed at  BCQS International for the past year as a valuation surveyor.

Regardless of his plans, whether personal or professional, Chad values the advice of his mother. Each step of his journey has been paved with a strong, loving maternal influence of his mother with the support of grandmother Marie Monerville and older sister Akeila, who he describes as “almost a second mother”.

“Even when I travel they are always calling. There is a strong female influence in my life,” Chad noted. And while it can be a bit much at times, he has come to rely on it.

For her part, Sue is grateful to all those who have helped her to “raise Chad”.

“I couldn’t do it alone. These people are special to me. People like his primary school principal Mr Ward, Tyrone Walker, Eugene Pilgrim, his lessons teachers, people who gave Chad a ride when I couldn’t leave work. They were committed,” said Sue. (KG)

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