Millions in US without power

CAROL MARTINDALE, carolmartindale@nationnews.com

Added 30 October 2012

sandycleanup

NEW YORK (AP) — The misery of superstorm Sandy's  devastation grew today as millions along the U.S. East Coast faced life without power or mass transit for days, and huge swaths of New York City remained eerily quiet. The U.S. death toll climbed to 39, many of the victims killed by falling trees, and rescue work continued. The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with hurricane force cut power to more than 8.2 million across the East and put the presidential campaign on hold just one week before Election Day. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart closed for a second day. The storm caused the worst damage in the 108-year history of the city's subway system, and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said it could be four or five days before the biggest U.S. transit system was running again. "This was a devastating storm, maybe the worst that we have ever experienced," Bloomberg said. But the full extent of the damage in New Jersey was being revealed as morning arrived. Emergency crews fanned out to rescue hundreds. A hoarse-voiced New Jersey Governor Chris Christie gave bleak news at a morning news conference: Seaside rail lines washed away. No safe place on the state's barrier islands for him to land. Parts of the coast still under water. "It is beyond anything I thought I'd ever see," he said. "It is a devastating sight right now." The death toll from Sandy  in the U.S. included several killed by falling trees. Sandy killed ten people in New York City. It also killed 69 people in the Caribbean before making its way up the Eastern Seaboard. Airlines canceled more than 15 000 flights. New York City's three major airports remained closed. Some bridges into the city reopened at midday, but most major tunnels and bridges remained closed, as were schools and Broadway theaters.  

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