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Testing female arousal drug


Tony Best

Testing female arousal drug

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Help is on the way for women who have difficulty becoming sexually aroused.
If a company registered in Barbados succeeds, such women would be able to turn to a medication that some physicians and others are calling the female version of Viagra and Cialis.
Canadian firm Trimel Biopharma, in which wealthy Canadian businessman and Barbados resident Eugene Melnyck holds a substantial interest, is conducting clinical trials to test the effectiveness of the drug, which would be administered through the nose.
In a notice posted on its website, Trimel Biopharma announced some “positive results from [its] female dysfunction study” being conducted among 31 women, some of whom received the medication.
“Measure of genital arousal showed statistical significance versus placebo 30 minutes post-administration,” the company said.
Dr Milton Haynes, a prominent Barbadian physician and clinical associate professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at New York University School of Medicine who is also a senior attending obstetrician/gynaecologist at Lenox Hill Hospital, both in Manhattan, said: “Women have observed the beneficial results men have received from their use of Viagra and Cialis and they too are interested in a medication developed for them as well.”
Haynes, a former president of the influential New York County Medical Society, added: “Quite a lot of women are asking for such a medication, provided, of course, that it is approved by the United States Federal Drug Administration. They are looking for something that’s comparable to be used by females.
“There are some similar physiologic changes that take place in the male and female that cause the sexual dysfunction, but not to the same degree and at the same level as you have in the male,” added Haynes. “That is based on the great anatomic difference that exists between the two sexes.”
The ob/gyn specialist in New York for more than 35 years didn’t comment on the research being conducted by Trimel Biopharma, and he was careful not to recommend the use of medications now on the market.
“What I do know is that some women in the United States have gone so far as to try to get the medications from outside the United States, say, from Canada, and other places,” Haynes said.
According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, more than 43 per cent of American women – an estimated 40 million adults – experience some form of sexual disorder and the publication explained that any woman could experience it at some point in her life.
Experts who treat the disorder said it manifested itself in a lack of desire, the inability to become aroused, lack of orgasm, or painful intercourse.
Commonly referred to as frigidity, the problem, experts insist, might have physical or physiological causes that could be traced to such conditions as diabetes, heart disease, nerve disorders or hormone problems.
Other reasons for frigidity in women may be attributed to work-related stress and anxiety, depression or concern about the marriage or relationship, “past sexual trauma”, as well as being the side effect of drugs that affect the woman’s “desire and function”.
Trimel Biopharma Holdings Inc. was incorporated in 2008 in Barbados and wholly owns Trimel SRL, the principal operating entity of Trimel.
About two months ago, the shareholders of J5 Acquisition (Barbados) Limited approved the merger of the company with Trimel to form a Barbadian company, Surviving Corporation.
Melnyck, who also owns the Ottawa Senators National Hockey League Team in the Canadian capital and is a prominent racehorse owner in Barbados, is expected to hold a majority stake in the new company.
 

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