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Basketballer apologizes for dropkick


Barry Alleyne and Justin Marville

Basketballer apologizes for dropkick

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IT TOOK A MONTH, but Ricardo Yearwood said sorry yesterday.
In a televised interview on the Caribbean Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) the player apologized to his victim and fans for last month’s highly publicized dropkick of an opponent.
Yearwood finally broke his silence on the issue after receiving a life ban from the governing Barbados Amateur Basketball Association for his decision to jump-kick Cougars point guard Keith Mayers.
“It’s nothing that I would like to happen to anybody,” said Yearwood in last night’s interview with CBC’s Cheyne Jones.
“I just wanted to take this opportunity to mostly [give] my apologies first to Keith, the person who took the kick, because the reaction in retrospect is something that I would never like to happen again.
“. . . It was something totally out of character, and even though it was blown up and everybody got to see this spectacle, it was something, at the heart of it . . . . I think it destroyed what I’ve been trying to achieve all my life in this sport.”
Yearwood’s name became a household one for all the wrong reasons when the mercurial forward responded to an elbow from Mayers by dropkicking the opposing dreadlocked point guard in the neck. The incident further became a highly debated national issue after video footage of the kick was televised multiple times on CBC before going viral on Facebook and YouTube.
“. . . It was a total reaction to the fact that the game was a really physical game and the blow that I took was one that it was nothing I prepared for. It was one where basically it didn’t leave me in a state of much control,” said Yearwood of the decision to kick Mayers.
“It’s so difficult to try to say why because there’s nothing that could really justify it, or to really make it right in my mind. “People say ‘it’s about discipline’ and ‘it doesn’t look disciplined’, but I’m one of those people that strive to control my emotions. Yearwood has since struggled to come to grips with his ban, going as far as to stare down BABA president Derrick Garrett before launching into a verbal tirade against the basketball head.
However, Yearwood still hopes to have a role in the sport someday in the future.
“A life ban isn’t easy to take,” Yearwood acknowledged. “I just want to go on to coach and help mentor other people, other youngsters into the possibilities [of] where you can go in the sport for yourself and your character, because for me basketball is life.”
Station Hill is expected to file a court injunction against the BABA sometime this week after the sport’s governing body dismissed the Cavs’ call to overturn Yearwood’s life ban.

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