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Newbury folk for old school upbringing


sherieholder, [email protected]

Newbury folk for old school upbringing

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THE CONTINUING VIOLENCE at some football matches is forcing some young people to give serious thought about attending.
This week’s Street Beat, the first for 2012, takes place in Newbury, St George, where the young men of “Newbury 63” spoke about the topic of violence at football matches as well as the more regular fare.
“My cousin was the one killed in the last shooting. It is a lot of ignorant, foolish wars. No one should be getting killed at football,” said Damian Eversley.
Eversley said such incidents made it hard for others to organize their own football matches and gave all football tournaments a bad name.
“It makes you think twice before going anywhere with crowds, not just football, and now it’s hard to even get permission to hold tournaments and events,” he said.
Corey Charles said it was already unwise to attend football matches in certain areas, adding today’s youth were too strong headed.
“They feel like if they got a gun or a knife then they are the biggest thing. I’m no old man but these youth are coming up with a gold spoon in their mouths, they don’t have the upbringing we had,” he said.
Another youth, who requested anonymity, added: “I was raised ‘old school’ and I can see that many youth now don’t have the morals I was raised with.”
Ahmal Grazette said he believed violence at community football matches usually involved outsiders. Nevertheless, it was still necessary to consider whether it would be a good idea to attend certain matches.
As for Newbury, the men said they also held tournaments there from time to time but had never recorded any serious violence or fatalities. However, they said they needed more help from Government.
“We organize our own tournaments, but right now, I would like to see more [Government-sponsored] activities for the youngsters on a more regular basis to keep them occupied,” said Eversley.
Grazette said Newbury was a good place for innovation but they needed help.
“If we can get some marl put down and get the bush cut, we could have a smoother pasture for the children to play or we could hold jams to build up money for the community.
“Right now, the lights here operate at half strength, so we can’t play football at night. Peoplepay more attention to basketball and netball but [is] football considered to be for the ‘rebellers’. Hopefully, things will improve this year,” he said.
As for the neighbourhood, the men reached a consensus that Newbury was a peaceful place where everybody lived together.
Sherry-Ann Mayers is the proprietor of the Hillside Lime shop. She said she grew up in Newbury and watched how it has changed.
“Where the field is used to be a cane field and a gully. Things have improved a lot, now we got a play park thanks to [Member of Parliament] Gline Clarke,” she said.
Mayers said she appreciated the presence of the young men in the area as they looked out for her and did not give her any trouble.

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