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March to the beat of Jesus


Cheryl Harewood

March to the beat of Jesus

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WALK IN step with Jesus.

Sometimes you may have a misstep, slow step, a fast step or step out of line, but always aim to walk in step with Jesus Christ.

With members of the Pathfinders beautifully attired in their uniforms and fulfilling various roles in the 11 a.m. divine worship at Workman’s Seventh-day Adventist Church last Saturday, Pastor Roosevelt Haynes, himself a master Pathfinder, urged the congregation to follow in  the footsteps of Jesus Christ.

Though bringing smiles and laughter to many, his thought-provoking message was riddled with examples of how being a Pathfinder, marching to the beat and performing dutiful drills was similar to that of the Christian walk.

Haynes explained that “the person who walks in step” with the teachings of Jesus Christ would gain eternal life. He likewise said that in the element of drilling and marching, one person must take charge and those within the squad must obey that person’s commands.

“If a person falls out of step, the entire squad also falls out of line, since individuals are usually combined in the squad to portray an element of unity and teamwork.”

He noted that sometimes in drilling and marching, things could happen to cause chaos and confusion. He also likened this to the Christian walk.

“A misstep in marching will happen when you miss the timing of the beat. Missteps will also take place in your Christian walk, but a man who wants to be in step with God, even when he makes a misstep or falls, he does not stay on the ground.”

The minister also told his listeners that instead of getting angry when they made mistakes in their Christian walk, they should continue to persevere and not give up.

“As long as we confess our faults, God is faithful to forgive us and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. The thing to do is when we step out of line, we should fall back in step and simply follow the commands of the leader.”

He described the individual who makes a slow step as “the one who is still in the group but not marching as fast as they should”.

He said such an individual could have been a member of a church for many years but never grew spiritually to the point where they ought to be teachers of the Gospel and not just listeners.

“The Christian walk is one of spiritual progress. Individuals must keep growing in Jesus Christ and use their God-given talents for the edification of the Body of Christ.”

Haynes, however, cautioned that those who made fast steps and were ahead of others “should not condemn the individual who is growing slowly in the faith or who has made mistakes along the way”.

He further spoke of those who step out of line by leaving the squad altogether. This, he said, was a sign of having given up. He appealed to the congregation not to become weary of the detours they often encounter in their walk with Christ.

The visiting pastor further advised his listeners not to conform to this world’s standards but to walk in step with Jesus Christ by abiding in Him.

“Be an example of the believers in love, spirit, faith and purity, and give attention to reading the Word of God.”

After the service, a few members spoke on the impact of the sermon.

“I think it was a good concept of the Christian experience and what the Pathfinders should be doing,” Marcia Webster told the DAILY NATION. “It was also a spiritual application one can follow, as it relates to the practical aspects of a major component of Pathfinders.”

For Pauline Murray, it was “timely”.

“It was thought-provoking and covered a vast area of topics that we struggle with today. I liked how he focused on the life of a Pathfinder but tied it in with the life of a Christian to show that at times we make mistakes, but just like a marcher, we must never give up but keep stepping,” she said.

Cecilia Stewart saw it as a message “filled with so much on how we should walk the Christian walk”.

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