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HEALING HERBS: Jamaican ackee holds key


ANNETTE MAYNARD-WATSON, [email protected]

HEALING HERBS: Jamaican ackee holds key

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HAVE YOU EVER HEARD of a Bajan police officer whose mannerisms are healing?

Sergeant Forde, who is attached to Central Police Station in Bridgetown, is an incredible police officer. Whoever is responsible for promoting him is observant
and his blessed parents did an excellent job while nurturing him. I publically thank him for being a true mentor and an on-the-spot counsellor.

During a recent emergency, I noticed his positive communication skills, his level of empathy, his sense of humour and his attention to detail. Last week I met him and his team in the middle of chaos after the jaws of life was employed.

I also want to thank all the people from the surrounding community, the support services, the medical staff and all who supported my family and I during our period of grace and hope.

At the end of last week, as I reflected on our family reality, I became a bit depressed. However, during that period the Creator allowed divine will to shower my consciousness with insight and wisdom. This week I am divinely refreshed and will educate you about a very exotic plant which reminds me of the jaws of life.

The name of this silent doctor is the Jamaican ackee. When we first hear about the jaws of life, we immediately think about death or serious injury, but it is used to assist in saving lives.

Likewise, when the name Jamaican ackee is called, many people cringe and think about poisoning. Let us go beyond that phase to discover more about the health benefits of the national fruit of Jamaica.

Jamaican ackee is listed as an exotic fruit. On the website drugs.com, research shows that the fruit has been used to treat colds, fever and diseases as varied as edema and epilepsy.

Further, on the website livestrong.com, it is revealed through the Pan American Health Organisation that ackee “is a good source of stearic, linoleic and palmitic acids. These fatty acids make up 55 per cent of the total fatty acids”. They can protect against depression.

Ackee has no saturated fat or cholesterol. Instead it contains riboflavin, iron, calcium, potassium, zinc and other nutrients. Zinc can be used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure, AIDS, asthma, psoriasis, sickle cell, peptic ulcers, acute diarrhoea and it can boost the immune system. It is effective against ADHD and Alzheimer’s disease.

Finally, I hope you see why I relate ackee to the jaws of life. I implore you to conduct extensive research about the Jamaican ackee.

Annette Maynard-Watson, a teacher and herbal educator, may be contacted via [email protected] or by telephone 250-6450.

*DISCLAIMER: It is not our intention to prescribe or make specific claims for any products. Any attempts to diagnose or treat real illness should come under the direction of your health care provider.

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