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PUDDING & SOUSE: Dropping their guard


BARBADOS NATION

PUDDING & SOUSE: Dropping their guard

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FIVE WATCHMEN hired to guard a business have been found sleeping on the job.

The business, which is in the heart of The City, recently always has a lot of money on its premises, so there has to be great care on what transpires there.

One of the watchmen behaves as if he is in the Barbados Defence Force and is very stern about anything and everything while he is on duty. He challenges the bosses when they come to work early or leave very late and even demands to see what is in their bags.

Last year he caught a big shot who likes to talk about strategy doing something he considered hanky-panky and decided to challenge his actions. But this time this bulldog of a watchman and all the others on duty with him were like little pussycats, apparently preferring to be in the Belle or even by Carlton in Black Rock watching the moon and the stars.

Since someone was able to break into The City building and escape, the plan is to give these watchmen new duties as guards at a construction company.

The long way home

From Station Hill to Oistins to Holetown to Station Hill and a lot of other places across Barbados, choirs were singing the same song throughout this past week. It was that old standard by Ray Charles, Hit The Road Jack.

The request was for the man who was once considered as their commander-in-chief. He turns 65 this year and the men and women who have been singing out aloud or simply humming the tune said for better or worse he should stay where he is. They say the fresh breeze coming down from Arthur Seat, Cane Garden and Jackmans would do the lungs of anyone good.

The feeling is that at a certain time a man should look to the spiritual Father and forget the things of this earth. After an extended period of easy money, the men and women of what some call the Khaki and Blue Chorale feel if money like the Lotto is available, then it should be taken since no one knows when their number will be called.

The chorale has also been singing another song, Time Marches On by Tracy Lawrence, saying that it is the ideal song for relatives of the man once considered commander-in-chief, even of dogs, horses, cymbals and jeeps.

This other fellow, with ailments left, right and centre even fell out of a chair. They do believe this colleague is genuinely ill and believes he needs to give up on dreams of going any further. Sometimes trying to be number two can cause a lot of strain.

Stubborn householder

Neighbours of a young woman who claimed she was put out would like her to stop telling lies. They say that for more than two years she was out of the house she claimed to occupy, but she keeps putting things in the man’s house after refusing to return his keys.

The concerned neighbours and friends say that, contrary to her claim, she can go to live with her mother, who has a house in the east of the island, but she just wants to be in The City.

While the woman is claiming the house needs repairs, neighbours are denying her claim. They say they have told her what she is doing is wrong, but she is bent on getting a Government house for free.

The neighbours feel the young woman should stop telling lies before they come back to haunt her.

Manners not on menu

A big question surfaced recently about the goings-on at a recent big-up function. Well, based on what transpired, these questions were not out of place.

Lancelot of Kew was addressing natives and guests at a big-able function which had all sorts of people there, the big, the small and the aspirants. But to the amazement of all, there was a display of poor manners instead of poise and dignity. One was seen moving through the audience, plate full and feeding the face as if on the hunt for the last bit of sustenance. Many said sotto voce, “That’s not the way it is done; it is not part of our culture.”

Perhaps the National Cultural Foundation should define for all Barbadians how to maintain the national dignity wherever they may go.

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