Posted on

BWA prepares sewer network for rainy season 


PR

BWA prepares sewer network for rainy season 

Social Share
Share

AS THE RAINY season approaches the Waste Water Division (WWD) of the Barbados Water Authority (BWA) is reporting that plans to reduce over-flooding of the sewer network are well underway.  

Necessary work is being funded primarily through the BTI – the Barbados Tourism Investment Inc.’s $2 million Rehabilitation Fund for the South Coast Sewage Treatment Plant or SCSTP. This follows the November/December 2016 event, which saw overflows on the island’s south coast.  

Head of the WWD, Patricia Inniss says the division is working steadily to make sure there is maximum pumping capacity at the plant’s influent and effluent wells. She noted that part of the BTI funds has gone towards the purchase of four new effluent pumps which are all on island.

One of the pumps was installed at the end of the April and the division is currently regulating the pumps’ compatibility with equipment at the plant before installing the other three pumps.  This is to ensure that pumping capacity at the effluent well is not compromised.  

Additional cleaning of the outfalls for the Bridgetown and south coast plants has been scheduled and inspection of the networks continue. Divers will be inspecting the pipeline shortly to identify and repair any major cracks, while manholes from Rendezvous to Graham Hall and others leading to the plant are also being monitored.  

The FOG or Fats Oil and Grease program which started two months ago, continues and to date more than three hundred customers have been visited, of this number 200 are businesses and a hundred are Food Service Establishments (FSE).

The aim is to educate the public about the proper disposal of sewage and the correct design and installation of building sewers and fixtures. 

Meanwhile, BWA inspectors have reported a positive response from owners and operators of FSEs who have been adhering to advice from the WWD on the proper way to reduce the presence of unwanted FOG in the sewer networks. 

 
Inniss stressed that in order to reduce the likelihood of sewage overflow during heavy and continuous rainfall customers need to be prepared and she cautioned against using the sewage network as a storm drain. 

Therefore, customers should make sure that manholes and junctions boxes remained closed during flooding to minimise infiltration of surface water into the sewers as the BWA maintains its efforts to upgrade the system. (PR) 

 

 

LAST NEWS