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Govt ‘knew of pluses’


ALEX DOWNES, [email protected]

Govt ‘knew of pluses’

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What should have been a no brainer for Barbados regarding the hosting of the 2018 ICC Women’s World Twenty20 has become a no-ball as far as the Barbados Cricket Association (BCA) is concerned.

Government was well aware of the financial benefits to be had by hosting what could have been Barbados’ fourth major cricket tournament, the BCA contended during a press conference yesterday.

“We actually met with the minister on November 23 and we presented to the minister the draft MOU [memorandum of understanding]. We also presented the budget template that came from Cricket West Indies,” BCA chief executive officer Noel Lynch said.

“That budget template . . . actually outlines that the only cost Barbados would have incurred would be the cost associated with the renting of the stadium,” he added.

A copy of that template budget projected that the ICC would have paid US$523 906 to host preliminary matches at Kensington Oval, while Kensington Oval Management Inc. (KOMI) would be responsible for shelling out US$96 500. The ICC would have entirely covered operating costs, security and vehicles to transport the team and match officials.

Lynch said the BCA was also in discussions with KOMI at the time to negotiate the costs which were at them. 

BCA president Conde Riley said that on November 28, the BCA executive met with Minister of Tourism Richard Sealy, who gave his blessings and support towards the hosting of the tournament, which runs from November 3 to 24.

Riley explained that the minister deemed the bid as a “no brainer”, going as far to suggest his ministry or the Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc. could pay the US$150 000 to host a zone, semi-finals and final if the bid was successful.

Additionally, Riley said the BHTA gave assurances that there would be no increase in hotel fees during the tournament’s hosting.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Freundel Stuart was sent a signed draft MOU and a summary of an Economic Impact Assessment on December 4, Riley revealed.

This assessment was completed by the University of the West Indies Cave Hill and the Barbados Tourism Authority for the 2010 World Twenty20, and showed that 5 100 visitors came to the island for the tournament, generating $23.8 million.

Riley noted the BCA had yet to hear back from the Prime Minister.

In a press conference last week Wednesday, Lashley indicated that he decided to not sign a Cricket West Indies letter of intent and give a guarantee, as its wording sought to bind Government to a number of things.

“My contention, which I communicated to the BCA, was that I could not sign that letter of intent in its current form because it sought to bind Government fully into everything it was asking for and it was not simply an expression of interest,” Lashley said at the time.

But Riley noted the letter of intent was just that: a letter of intent which did not have any monetary value.

And even as Government did not give its blessings, the BCA went ahead and submitted an ultimately failed bid, subtitled A Celebration Of Caribbean Women.

The president said the BCA was told which countries were designated matches, but would wait until the Cricket West Indies made an official announcement.

As he expressed disappointment at the failed bid, Riley said the BCA would now be turning its attention to hosting the regional Super50 tournament and also putting in a bid for the England Test match tour next year. (AD)

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