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Pupils sure they aced exam


ALEX DOWNES, [email protected]

Pupils sure they aced exam

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YESTERDAY WAS A TALE of two halves as far as the annual Barbados Secondary Schools’ Entrance Examination was concerned.

While Chief Education Officer Karen Best reported that the test, also referred to as the Common Entrance or 11-Plus, went off without a hitch, celebrations later in the day were marred by an accident at the Hilton Barbados hotel which left one adult and 13 children injured.

A total of 3 426 students wrote the exam, with more boys, 1 738, sitting than girls – 1 688.

Anxious parents

From as early as 7 a.m., students, along with their anxious parents, made their way to the 22 venues across the island for the test that determines which secondary school they will attend.

Many parents waited outside the examination centres patiently until the end around 1 p.m. to greet their children and wards, embracing and congratulating them on their efforts.

At Princess Margaret Secondary School in Six Roads, St Philip, where 229 children sat, many of them told the MIDWEEK NATION afterwards they were happy with their performance.

Destiny Gittens, an early sitter at ten years old, believed she performed well while noting some questions in the mathematics paper needed more time and effort than others.

Hilda Skeene Primary student Ebony Jones was confident she would pass for her school of choice, Christ Church Foundation.

Over at Foundation School in Christ Church, 206 students wrote the exam. Some reported both papers were “easy”, but a few found the comprehension section of the English paper challenging.

The story was basically the same in the North as students who sat at Coleridge & Parry School said they found the exam was not too difficult.

Relief

At Harrison College in The City, the pensive look on the faces of scores of parents waiting at the school gates was replaced by relief as the children ran into their arms.

“It was awesome. I left out nothing and it was pretty easy,” Wesley Hall Primary’s Angel Woodall said.

“Everyone was saying it was hard, so I went in thinking it was hard, but it wasn’t that hard,” her friend Naomi Gibson said. 

Read more in the Midweek Nation. Please see also pages 43 to 45.

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