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Nurse’s path ‘one to follow’


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Nurse’s path ‘one to follow’

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SEYMOUR NURSE was a role model for young sportspersons.

That is the view of Empire Club second vicepresident Julie Grant who was speaking to

NATION SPORT during the viewing of the late West Indies and Barbados cricketer at the Bank Hall club yesterday.

“When we hear about Seymour Nurse, we hear about technique, skill and class and I would like the cricketers, footballers and even those who play hockey from the Empire Club to look at who he was as a man and sportsman and to emulate those things. Looking at him and modelling those attributes can make them better in their individual sports and as people,” she said.

“He trained very hard. That is why his performances improved over the years. So there is some correlation between the physical fitness and the skill which he seemed to bind together.

These days, athletes don’t train as long as before but it can impact them significantly.”

Nursed passed away last week Monday at the age of 85.

Also paying tribute to Nurse ahead the thanksgiving service tomorrow at Kensington Oval was president of the Barbados Cricket Association (BCA) Conde Riley, BCA vice-president Calvin Hope, BCA director of cricket Steven Leslie, former Empire, Barbados and West Indies teammate Sir Charles Griffith, former Empire and Barbados allrounder Rawle Brancker, former West Indies wicket keeper David Murray, former Barbados captains Carlisle Best, Ryan Hinds and Jason Haynes.

Also in attendance was former cricketers, footballers and hockey players from Empire and others including Lonelle Hutson, George Brathwaite, Virgil Brodhagen, Hal Gollop, Dr Kerry Hall, Frank Gill, Nisha Craigwell and Gregory “Titmus” Armstrong.

Grant, who joined the club in the 1970s, said she saw Nurse active, not just as a player but someone who served the club in a variety of capacities.

“When I got here, he was very active in cricket.

He was still scoring runs and still training. I was told that he played two seasons without being [dismissed]. So that in itself is a record. After that, I saw him at committee level working. He came every month and made his contribution. We had formed a ladies football team and he came and supported. I was told one evening he scored six goals for Empire against Carlton. That is another record in itself,” she said.

She added that his love for young people resulting in several of them becoming successful under his wings.

“He was a teacher of cricket. He went on to the National Sports Council (NSC), and he continued to coach. A lot of them don’t continue. Working at the NSC, hundreds of them came through him. He had a love for cricket, a love for coaching, a love for teaching and a love for children. He wanted them to do well and this was evident when we see the names that came through his programmes. That passion led him to the Barbados team and to play for the West Indies,” Grant said. (RG)

FROM LEFT, Dr Kerry Hall, daughter Sir Wesley Hall, Seymour Nurse’s twin daughters Roseanne and Cherylanne Nurse and Barbados Netball Association president Nisha Craigwell, a niece, were among those who attended the viewing at the Empire Club.

FORMER Barbados and West Indies fast bowler Sir Charles Griffith viewing Seymour Nurse’s body

at the Empire Club. (Pictures by Kenmore Bynoe.)

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